In a previous article featured in Water Technology, “Building business with showerheads and faucets,” David Farley Sr., president and CEO of Sprite Industries Inc., and Jeanne Engle, director of marketing for Tomlinson Industries, discuss how water treatment dealers can close sales by educating customers. They can help their clients regarding the following topics:

  • The risks of chlorine exposure in the shower
  • How to conserve water
  • The performance and appearance of faucets and showerheads

Chlorine concerns

According to Farley, 50 percent of our daily exposure to chlorine is in the shower. “Basically, that is equal to all of the water you drink throughout the entire day if drinking from an unfiltered source,” says Farley. “In the shower, chlorine is inhaled into the lungs and passes directly into the blood stream.”

However, it is just as important to know the limitations of other types of media when recommending showerheads, Farley advises. Carbon, for example, is not considered an effective shower filter media. Carbon, using adsorption principles, is an effective drinking water filter. Because of the flow rates and temperature of shower water, carbon is less effective, according to Farley.

Appealing to high-end customers

As clients become more concerned with sustainability and design, dealers can increase business with high-end sales. This is important because the cost of raw materials and new manufacturing processes continue to affect prices. With the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act, some manufacturers were required to use different materials that have affected the price of many products, including showerheads and faucets.

However, some manufacturers were ahead of the curve. “Our faucets have always been lead-free,” explains Jeanne Engle, director of marketing for Tomlinson Industries. This act standardizes requirements across the nation, and it ensures that the faucets and other plumbing fixtures are not the source of lead in drinking water.”

In addition to manufacturing with safer materials, manufacturers are also mindful of function and standards. “Some differentiating features that set high-end faucets apart are construction and materials of construction, such as plastic versus metal; third-party certifications, such as NSF and [American National Standards Institute] (ANSI); and ceramic disk for smooth operation and flow control,” notes Engle.

Standards and programs, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) WaterSense program, verify that products meet specific environmental and performance criteria.

Whether answering a customer’s request to be environmentally responsible to deal with current drought concerns in the West, protecting customers from chlorine exposure or selling to the high-end customer, there are plenty of business opportunities to add showerhead filters and high-end fixtures.

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