Summer months present unique water concerns

Additional demands on water supplies and increases in the use of chemicals can affect water treatment demands for municipalities and raise concerns for homeowners.

Robert Ingelhart/iStock
Robert Ingelhart/iStock

Pools, lawn watering, fresh fruits and vegetables, and home garden weed prevention — summer brings additional demands on water supplies and increases in the use of chemicals, which can affect water treatment demands for municipalities and raise concerns for homeowners. This issue focuses on these summer water and treatment requirements.

In our cover story, a new treatment method for saline groundwater is discussed that improves the growth and crop production versus water that is not treated. With the new method, the crops’ production increased by 7.5 to 70 percent, depending on the crop type.

I Stock 91773041 Large 300x233

Imgorthand/iStock

In this issue’s Contaminant of the Month, Dr. Joe Cotruvo discusses the herbicide glyphosate, commonly known as Roundup as well as other brand names. He discusses how glyphosate gets into streams and other water sources, the chemical’s adverse environmental and health effects, and treatment methods to remove it.

When participating in summer activities — such as watering the lawn or filling a swimming pool — extreme water pressure fluctuations can occur. This is particularly troublesome for homes with private wells. Regulated flow is required, and one system to provide this can be found here.

As always, we want to cover topics important to you. Email me at lditoro@grandviewmedia.com or direct message us on Twitter
(@WaterTechOnline or @LoriDitoro) or Facebook to keep us informed on the subjects that matter most to you.

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