Editor’s Letter - September/October 2019

Welcome to the September/October edition of Industrial WaterWorld.

Angela Godwin Headshot 2017 Ww

Welcome to the September/October edition of Industrial WaterWorld. In the Ohio River Basin, a broad coalition led by the Electric Power Research Institute has developed the world’s largest water quality credit trading program. Through it, credits are generated by farmers and other landowners who use conservation practices that reduce nitrogen and phosphorus pollution going into waterways. Those credits can then be purchased by industrial users or other entities needing to comply with discharge permits or meet corporate sustainability goals. Jessica Fox tells us more about the program on page 10.

You probably know that the University of Connecticut, or UConn as the kids call it, is a 140-year-old institution of higher learning with a sprawling campus in Storrs, Conn. But did you know that the university also supplies water to 25,000 users? In the wake of a severe drought in 2005, UConn was mandated to reduce its water usage by a third. This led to the construction of a $25 million reclaimed water facility that supplies water for the cooling tower, chillers, and boilers, among other things. On page 14, Robert Scott discusses the project — its drivers, challenges, and outcomes.

Across a broad range of industries, measuring total residual oxidants (TRO) in discharge water is critical for regulatory compliance. On page 17, Andrew Xie explains how ion selective electrode technology is enabling modern TRO analyzers to deliver highly accurate, precise, and sensitive measurements.

A zero liquid discharge treatment process can deliver a host of economic and environmental benefits to industrial users, including reduction of waste, compliance with regulatory guidelines, and support for corporate social responsibility objectives. Malte Junker expands on the advantages of ZLD and discusses the importance of effective solid/liquid separation for a successful process. Turn to page 19 to learn more.

On page 31, Sal Boutureira discusses the advantages of fully automated wastewater treatment systems, which ease the process of complying with wastewater regulations. Such systems, he says, not only reliably meet regulatory wastewater requirements but also significantly reduce the cost of treatment, labor, and disposal.

As always, we’ve compiled a selection of products for your consideration, beginning with our Products & Services spotlight sections on page 21.

We hope you enjoy this edition of Industrial WaterWorld. Thanks for reading!Welcome to the September/October edition of Industrial WaterWorld. In the Ohio River Basin, a broad coalition led by the Electric Power Research Institute has developed the world’s largest water quality credit trading program. Through it, credits are generated by farmers and other landowners who use conservation practices that reduce nitrogen and phosphorus pollution going into waterways. Those credits can then be purchased by industrial users or other entities needing to comply with discharge permits or meet corporate sustainability goals. Jessica Fox tells us more about the program on page 10.

You probably know that the University of Connecticut, or UConn as the kids call it, is a 140-year-old institution of higher learning with a sprawling campus in Storrs, Conn. But did you know that the university also supplies water to 25,000 users? In the wake of a severe drought in 2005, UConn was mandated to reduce its water usage by a third. This led to the construction of a $25 million reclaimed water facility that supplies water for the cooling tower, chillers, and boilers, among other things. On page 14, Robert Scott discusses the project — its drivers, challenges, and outcomes.

Across a broad range of industries, measuring total residual oxidants (TRO) in discharge water is critical for regulatory compliance. On page 17, Andrew Xie explains how ion selective electrode technology is enabling modern TRO analyzers to deliver highly accurate, precise, and sensitive measurements.

A zero liquid discharge treatment process can deliver a host of economic and environmental benefits to industrial users, including reduction of waste, compliance with regulatory guidelines, and support for corporate social responsibility objectives. Malte Junker expands on the advantages of ZLD and discusses the importance of effective solid/liquid separation for a successful process. Turn to page 19 to learn more.

On page 31, Sal Boutureira discusses the advantages of fully automated wastewater treatment systems, which ease the process of complying with wastewater regulations. Such systems, he says, not only reliably meet regulatory wastewater requirements but also significantly reduce the cost of treatment, labor, and disposal.

As always, we’ve compiled a selection of products for your consideration, beginning with our Products & Services spotlight sections on page 21.

We hope you enjoy this edition of Industrial WaterWorld. Thanks for reading!

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