Editor’s Letter - November/December 2019

Welcome to the November/December edition of Industrial WaterWorld.

Welcome to the November/December edition of Industrial WaterWorld. It’s a bittersweet moment for us, as this is the last edition of a publication that we have been proud to deliver for nineteen years. Although we’ll miss its familiar pages, we are extremely excited for the next evolution in Industrial WaterWorld’s history. Beginning with our very next issue, we are merging forces with another highly revered industrial-water industry publication, Water Technology magazine. And rest assured: although it may look a little different than Industrial WaterWorld, Water Technology will continue to deliver the topics, trends, technologies, and quality content that you’ve come to expect from our editorial team and contributors.

And so, while this may be the last edition of IWW, it is by no means the least. We’ve put together some great stories for you, starting with our feature article on page 10. Here, editor Alanna Maya discusses a topic near and dear to our hearts: beer. Er, I mean, water, used in the beer-making process. At Sierra Nevada Brewing Company, sustainability is at the heart of what they do — from rooftop solar panels to electric-­vehicle charging stations and sustainable farming practices. But as Alanna explains, it’s the brewer’s attention to water and wastewater that caught our eye.

Data. It drives our modern world. Tweets, posts, emails, photos, videos — the server space needed to pave the information highway is staggering. And those servers are hot stuff. Literally. On page 14, Carla De Las Casas and Thomas Steinwinder discuss how today’s enormous data centers need ‘hyperscaled’ water and wastewater solutions for their evaporative cooling systems.

In our next feature, we travel to India, where poor water quality presented challenges for a chemical manufacturer. The plant’s existing water treatment system couldn’t handle the high turbidity of source water from a local river, particularly following a rain event. As an alternative to its conventional filters and clarifiers, the plant installed a hydrodynamic separation system to ensure high-quality water for its processes. Author Udi Lesham explains the solution — and how it fit into a very tight space — on page 16.

Thirsty oil and gas processes are faced with some big challenges: aging infrastructure, water scarcity, and stringent wastewater effluent requirements are just a few. Stephen Katz, market development manager for water reuse with SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions, joins us for a special Q&A discussion about how membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology is helping refiners address those challenges and more. Read the full interview on page 18.

In Marilia, Brazil, FEMSA bottles up beverages for one of the world’s largest soft drink manufacturers. But all that fizzy goodness has a stinky side and in 2017, neighbors began to complain about the odors emanating from the facility. Plant managers opted to try a reinforced odor control system with integrated activated carbon filters. The “breathable” geomembrane covers had worked well for FEMSA’s Mexico City facility, so Marilia’s team had high hopes that it would solve its odor problem too. They were not disappointed. Read the full story on page 31.

And finally, as always, we’ve compiled a selection of products for your consideration, beginning with our Products & Services spotlight sections on page 20.

We hope you enjoy this farewell edition of Industrial WaterWorld and we look forward to meeting you again among the pages of Water Technology in 2020. 

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