Atmospheric water generation market worth more than $9B by 2022

A report by Global Market Insights projects the global atmospheric water generation (AWG) market will reach $9.31 billion by the end of 2022 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 37.41 percent. The growth will largely be driven by an increased demand for freshwater for drinking and industrial uses.

Regulatory efforts such as the Drinking Water Quality Section in Japan, the Safe Drinking Water Act in the U.S., the National Rural Drinking Water Program in India and the European Union’s Drinking Water Directive should propel growth.

While AWG technologies are energy-intensive, the report authors expect research and development investments to drive new growth opportunities in the market.

West desiccation machines are expected to grow by more than 40 percent by 2022. Cooling condensation machines will also grow, largely driven by widespread accessibility and innovations related to power consumption reductions.

Report: Water concerns to drive European industrial chemical market

With concerns over sustainable water practices growing, the European water treatment chemicals market is poised for growth, according to a new analysis.

Research firm Technavio expects Europe’s industrial water treatment chemicals market to grow at a CAGR of nearly six percent from 2016 to 2020. Categorizing the market into three segments:

  • Process water treatment will reach $3.43 billion by 2020 with a CAGR of 6.44 percent.
  • Effluent water treatment will grow steadily with about a five percent rate.
  • Raw water treatment is expected to grow at CAGR of 5.2 percent to reach $1.34 billion.

Projected to grow the fastest, the process water treatment segment held about 46 percent market share in 2015.

Singapore aims to stimulate economy with industrial water investment

Over the next five years, Singapore’s government will invest S$200 million into the water industry in three key areas: research, commercialization and export of technology, and talent development.

PUB, the country’s national water agency, aims to add 15,000 jobs and about S$2.8 billion to the economy by 2020 with the funds. PUB also wants to support research focused on industrial water solutions, smart water systems and irrigation.

The water sector added 14,000 jobs and S2.2 billion to the economy from 2006 to 2015 when Singapore’s government invested S$470 million.

India’s water shortage may deter manufacturing companies

Low water prices and weak usage enforcement may hurt India’s chances in bringing large companies to the country. With nearly a sixth of the world’s population and only four percent of the plant’s freshwater, demand is expected to pass the supply by about 50 percent by 2030.

Heraldnet.com claims politics are one reason for the cheap water, since politicians want to pacify voters and campaign contributors.

Several factories have taken steps to save water, and although they only account for eight percent of water use, they are often among the first users to get hit during water shortages. Several factories have shuttered all or a portion of operations in the country because of the issue, including Coca-Cola’s 2014 decision not to build a $24 million factory after farmer protests.