AWWA announces launch of Biological Treatment Symposium event

The American Water Works Association (AWWA) announced the launch of its newest event, the 2013 Biological Treatment Symposium, to be held March 28-29, in Denver, Colo. Registration for the symposium is now open. The symposium will focus on biological drinking water treatment technology, operations and monitoring strategies. The leading-edge symposium will dissect the benefits of engineered and passive biological systems from both the research and utility perspectives. The technical program, developed by expert planning committee members, will address ways to meet current and future regulatory requirements while ensuring continued public health protection during implementation and operation. More than 30 technical sessions will cover high-interest topics ranging from research perception, performance and practice, microbiological aspects of biotreatment, membrane pretreatment, trace organics and much more. Attendees are encouraged to register for the conference by Feb. 27, 2013 to receive discounted pricing.

 

A decade of planning, preparation comes to fruition

On December 4 the city of Brush, Colo. was able to celebrate 10 years of planning, hard work and dedication with the official grand opening of its new and innovative wastewater treatment plant. County officials, plant operators, contractors, crews and business representatives gathered at the site for the ceremony. The day of celebration included tours, speeches and a wealth of information. 

 

Data shows water utilities are selecting more composite meters in preparation for 2014

Sales data from Sensus shows water utilities nationwide are increasingly selecting composite meters pending provisions to the Safe Drinking Water Act that will take effect in 2014. The composite water meters meet all guidelines and are stronger and more durable than traditional bronze meters. New legislation reduces the permissible amount of lead in water distribution system products from as much as 8 percent to no more than 0.25 percent for wetted surfaces of pipe, pipe fittings and plumbing fittings and fixtures and to 0.2 percent for solder and flux. Sensus addressed lead-related concerns in the U.S. by introducing the zero-lead iPERL™ and accuSTREAM™ residential meters in 2010 and 2011, respectively, as part of its AquaSense™ intelligent water management solution. 

 

Board members in Pa. move forward with $34 million wastewater treatment plant project

Board members voted to advertise a $34 million project to upgrade the wastewater treatment plant in South Abington, Pa. Project Engineer James Elliot of Gannett Fleming Inc. said the designs are complete and the project is ready to move forward. A bid will be held by the board members on January 6. The project is expected to start in April and must be completed by October 2015. The treatment plant in South Abington Twp. serves sewer users in Clarks Summit, Clarks Green and South Abington.

 

City in N.Y. set to receive improvements to wastewater treatment plant

The wastewater treatment plant in Norwich, N.Y. could be seeing some improvements soon after being approved for a $2 million grant. The Board of Directors of the New York State Environmental Facilities Corp. (EFC) approved the grant along with $1,611,415 in no-interest financing. Some of the aging equipment used in the filtration process will be replaced with the additional funding. Included in the $4.36 million improvements will be new rotating biological contactors, where microorganisms dissolve waste as a secondary treatment process.

 

Man injures leg while installing equipment at wastewater treatment plant

While installing new equipment at the wastewater treatment plant in Lansdale, Pa., a contractor suffered a minor injury to his leg. Wastewater plant Supervisor Dan Shinskie said the man was working to unload a new effluent measuring device when he got stuck between a storage tank and the truck he was unloading from. The contractor was immediately taken to a nearby hospital in an ambulance to evaluate the injury. Shinskie said there was no bleeding externally, but he was unable to move his leg.

 

Overflowing sewer sends estimated 2,250 gallons of untreated wastewater into local streams

An estimated 2,250 gallons of untreated wastewater was sent from an overflowing sewer into a storm drain feeding local streams. The public has been warned by the state health department to stay out of Nuuanu Stream from Kuakini Avenue to Nimitz Highway. The city’s Department of Environmental Services said a pipe that was clogged up resulted in the untreated wastewater being sent out of a manhole into the storm drain. At the time of the report water samples were being taken to determine the environmental effects.

 

PEOPLE

• New Albany, Ind. has named former Environmental Management Corp. (EMC) employee Robert Sartell as its new wastewater utility director. As an EMC employee Sartell oversaw the city’s sewer treatment facility through the end of 2012. He also has 35 years of experience in wastewater operations. Mayor Jeff Gahan received approval from the New Albany Sewer Board to end privatization of the wastewater utility last year. Sartell is certified with an Indiana Class IV Wastewater Treatment License and an Indiana Class A Industrial Wastewater License.

• Whitewater Technologies announced the appointment of former Chief Business Officer Issey Ende to chief executive officer. Ende will be succeeding Dovev Lewinsohn, who over the past five years successfully took Whitewater from its start up phase to the point where it has won major contracts in Israel, Europe and the U.S. As Whitewater enters its next phase of broader market adoption, Ende will lead the company to a more regionally focused and customer oriented direction. This strategy will enable the company to take advantage of its position having unique solutions and technology advantages. Ende assumed his new role January 1.