Some water treatment dealers who service light commercial and residential accounts and sell point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE) equipment tend to get comfortable if steady business exists. However, there are many opportunities within the broader water treatment market. Additionally, as water supplies continue to be stressed and the world’s need for clean water continues to grow, more water sources are needed.

You will notice many solutions in this newsletter. Not only is recycling and reusing water important for our world’s future, it is also profitable if systems and advice are sound. There are many resources, in addition to this newsletter and Water Technology’s monthly magazine, for you to utilize if your company is currently considering offering water reuse and recycling services.

In order to understand the need for water reuse and why it is needed, customers need to first understand that recycling can pertain to water just as it applies to aluminum, glass, newspaper, etc. Generally, customers are unaware of the practical uses of treated wastewater. For instance, we use more water for landscaping and irrigation purposes, especially in commercial settings, than for anything else. For indoor use, according to epa.gov, 26.7 percent of all water use is for operating toilets.

If you are positioning your company as a water conservation solution, it is important to make customers aware of how their water is currently being used. If practical, conduct a water audit to assess this information. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also offers detailed information, such as that found at http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/pubs/indoor.html.

After you and your customers have completed an informal examination or water audit, you can highlight the many cost saving opportunities that pertain to water reuse. Now that there are simple ways to maximize our water supply and use untraditional sources of water, such as recycled wastewater, U.S. cities across the nation are starting to implement these steps. An example is the city of San Diego.

According to sandiego.gov, “The use of recycled water as an alternative water resource for irrigation and commercial processes will help the city (San Diego) meet our future water needs and reduce wastewater flows into the ocean outfall.”

This California city is a great example of how recycled water is playing an important part in the area’s future. To review San Diego’s water recycling plan, its purpose as well as expected costs, visit http://www.sandiego.gov/water/recycled/faq.shtml.

The EPA also offers an abundance of information on water reuse and recycling. Interested dealers are encouraged to visit http://www.epa.gov/region9/water/recycling for more information.