New EPA report examines potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on water resources

June 10, 2015
The Environmental Protection Agency has released a new draft report examining the potential impacts that hydraulic fracturing has on drinking water resources across the nation. The purpose of the research is to help clarify the relationship, if any, between these two entities.

WASHINGTON, DC, June 10, 2015 -- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released a new draft report examining the potential impacts that hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has on drinking water resources across the nation. The purpose of the research is to help clarify the relationship, if any, between these two entities.

Completed at the request of Congress, the assessment shows that while fracking activities in the U.S. are carried out in a way that have not led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources, there are potential vulnerabilities in the water lifecycle that could impact drinking water.

The study compiles available scientific literature and data to assess how fracking can potentially change the quality or quantity of drinking water resources, as well as identify factors affecting the frequency or severity of these changes.

As part of the report, EPA researchers conducted 17 individual projects that resulted in over 20 peer-reviewed research papers. The results are integrated from EPA-led research efforts with a broad literature review and input from stakeholders through the Agency's technical outreach.

The EPA-led research efforts involved the analysis of existing data and consisted of a variety of case studies, laboratory studies, scenario evaluations, and toxicological studies. Further, the assessment encompassed water acquisition, chemical mixing, well injection, flowback and produced water, and wastewater treatment and waste disposal.

The new draft report can be used by federal, tribal, state, and local officials; industry; and the public to better understand and address any vulnerabilities that fracking creates for drinking water resources.

See also:

"New USGS publications unveil historical hydraulic fracturing trends and data"

"Fracking: Time to end US “wild west” wastewater treatment"

###

Sponsored Recommendations

NFPA 70B a Step-by-Step Guide to Compliance

NFPA 70B: A Step-by-Step Guide to Compliance

MV equipment sustainability depends on environmentally conscious design values

Medium- and low voltage equipment manufacturers can prepare for environmental regulations now by using innovative MV switchgear design that eliminates SF6 use.

Social Distancing from your electrical equipment?

Using digital tools and apps for nearby monitoring and control increases safety and reduces arc flash hazards since electrical equipment can be operated from a safer distance....

Meet the future of MV switchgear

SureSeT new-generation metal-clad. Smarter. Smaller. Stronger.