Water reuse market expected to increase by 58 percent over next 10 years

New research from Bluefield Research shows substantial growth expectations over the next 10 years in the water reuse market. The reuse market is expected to grow by 58 percent over the period, with California and Florida showing the most growth potential. The research, which was based on 607 planned reuse projects, showed California edging out previous reuse market front-runner Florida, with California accounting for 36 percent of planned projects and Florida accounting for 26 percent. California currently boasts $4.3 billion in planned water reuse projects. Another $11 billion in reuse projects is expected over the 10-year period.

GE collaborates on world’s largest membrane aerated biofilm reactor system

GE announced that the Yorkville-Bristol Sanitary District (YBSD) in the Fox River watershed in Illinois is the first customer for its new ZeeLung membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) technology. YBSD will use ZeeLung MABR to upgrade the existing plant to increase its treatment capacity within the existing biological reactors. The upgrade also involves modifications to enable biological phosphorous removal. When commissioned in 2017, the plant will be the world’s largest MABR system.
YBSD provides wastewater collection and treatment services for the city of Yorkville, Illinois, with a population of 18,035 residents. YBSD’s treatment facility is an activated sludge plant with a design average flow of 3.62 million gallons per day. The plant is operating near its design load and to accommodate new industries within the city, YBSD sought a cost-effective solution to increase the treatment capacity. The plant also faces more stringent discharge regulations for phosphorous.
ZeeLung MABR technology is a simple solution that allows municipalities to achieve nutrient removal and/or capacity expansion in existing tank volumes while significantly reducing energy consumption. It employs an innovative gas transfer membrane to deliver oxygen to a biofilm that is attached to the membrane surface. Immersing ZeeLung cassettes into mixed liquor increases the inventory of biomass in a treatment system thereby intensifying the biological treatment process. Oxygen is delivered to the biofilm by diffusion through the membrane, which reduces the energy required for oxygen delivery by up to four times compared to conventional aeration.

Pennsylvania wastewater plant upgraded with GE’s LEAPmbr Technology

Seeking to increase the wastewater treatment capacity at the Brush Creek sewage plant without expanding its footprint, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania, turned to GE’s high-performance LEAPmbr membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology for an upgrade. Once complete, the expanded Brush Creek Water Pollution Control Facility will treat more than 7 million gallons per day of wastewater, and the effluent will meet current and future nutrient and discharge limitations.
GE is supplying its LEAPmbr advanced wastewater treatment system to GHD, which is one of the world’s leading engineering procurement and construction companies operating with projects in water, energy, resources, property development and transportation.
The Brush Creek Water Pollution Control Facility currently treats 3.4 million gallons of wastewater per day and once the expansion is complete in early 2018, it will be able to treat an average of 7.2 million gallons of wastewater daily. In the future, the plant will be able to increase capacity to 8.73 million gallons per day and have an organic capacity of 19,200 pounds per day.
The plant provides wastewater treatment services to all of Cranberry Township along with portions of Pine, Marshall and New Sewickley Townships. Wastewater is collected from area homes, businesses and industries and after being treated is discharged into Brush Creek.