LATHAM, N.Y. — Water Technology recently interviewed Jim Procanik, managing director of InfiniteEARTH.

InfiniteEARTH's goal is to move the world from an unsustainable extractive economy to a sustainable replacement economy by changing the way the world views the consumption and pricing of goods and services. The organization is in charge of the Rimba Raya Biodiversity Project in Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Rimba Raya is a forest that was once designated for destruction and conversion into a palm oil plantation. InfiniteEARTH was able to save the forest, which is now dedicated for the protection and preservation of hundreds of at-risk species, most notably, the Bornean Orangutan. The Rimba Raya reserve is certified as a REDD+ project, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, which creates a financial value for the carbon stored in forests and offers incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development.  It was also the first forest carbon project in the world to receive triple-gold certification under the Climate Community and Biodiversity Alliance Standards.

To achieve its mission, InfiniteEARTH provides clean water, cook stoves, healthcare and employment to the local community that helps them live sustainably within the local environment.

When Water Technology caught up with Procanik, he was able to tell us about how the Rimba Raya initiative got started, why clean water efforts are important there, how they are carried out and how they have made a difference for the people and the environment of Rimba Raya.

"It's basically a community development project, very much so," said Procanik. "It focuses on helping the communities to develop alternative livelihoods that are not destructive to the environment, which is typical for the area."

Listen to the rest of our conversation with Procanik on our podcast page, here: https://www.watertechonline.com/podcasts.