STERLING, Colo. — Unlike many regions in the country, the South Platte River is running high with water this year, according to Coloradoindependent.com.

Overflowed levees and an abundance of mud stand in contrast to drier years like 2012, noted the article. One ranch hand in the article said that now it’s hard to believe the area could run out of water.

However, the South Platte River Basin population is expected to double over the next 35 years, and officials say the water will not be enough for the cities and farmers when that happens, stated the article. One plan to help with the issue involves filling reservoirs with water from the main stream.

The South Platte River Basin spans 22,000 square miles and feeds into several well-known waterways including “the Big Thompson, Cache la Poudre and St. Vrain rivers; and Boulder, Clear and Cherry creeks,” reported the article. People rely on the river for drinking water and farmland nourishment.

Gov. John Hickenlooper ordered plan to address the issue in 2013, shared the article. The final draft is due July 15. The strategy will involve projects for nine major river basins in the state.

Farmers and cities have discussed how to handle the issue, asserted the article. Jim Yahn, a farmer who serves on the local irrigation district board, said in the article that technical challenges exist regarding how to handle an increase in water. The costs of building more infrastructures would be high.

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